How Did We Get The Bible?

A great article posted in biblegateway.com from Dr. Timothy Paul Jones on how we got the bible, it’s origins and understanding.

How We Got the Bible: An Interview with Timothy Paul Jones

God Bless

Brian Mason

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Terminology Tuesday: Logocentrism

The designation by postmodern philosophers such as Jacques Derrida for the philosophical method that looks to the logos (the word or written language) as the carrier of meaning. Derrida rejects the attendant philosophical assumption that human language is able to designate, signify or represent an essence (or presence of being) that we can come to know.

God Bless

Brian Mason

*Stanley J. Grenz, David Guretzki &, Cherith Fee Nordling, Pocket Dictionary of Theological Terms (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1999), p. 72

Terminology Tuesday: Thomism, neo-Thomism

Thomism refers to the teachings of Thomas Aquinas and the subsequent philosophical and theological schools that were based on his thought. The twentieth century revival of Thomism, known as neo-Thomism, took two major forms: transcendental Thomism (represented by Karl Rahner and Bernard Lonergan) accommodates the major concerns of Thomism with insights from Immanuel Kant, whereas neoscholastic Thomism (represented by Etienne Gilson and Jacques Maritain) seeks to recover and reaffirm a “pure version” of Aquinas’s original teachings.

*Stanley J. Grenz, David Guretzki &, Cherith Fee Nordling, Pocket Dictionary of Theological Terms (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1999), p. 114

God Bless

Brian Mason

Terminology Tuesday: Covenant, Covenant Theology

*Covenant refers to the act of God in freely establishing a mutually binding relationship with humankind. Through the covenant God bestows blessings on humans in conditional and unconditional terms. Conditionally, God blesses humans as they obey the terms of the covenant. God made covenants with Noah, Abraham, Moses and David. But above all, God has fulfilled these covenants and has inaugurated the New Covenant in Christ, which is for all people who trust in Him (Heb 9: 15, 27-28). Covenant theology is the system of theology that centers on God as a covenant-making God and sees in the history of creation two great covenants: the covenant of works and the covenant of grace. Covenant theology asserts that prior the the Fall God made a covenant of works with Adam as the representative of all humankind. In response to Adam’s disobedience God established a new covenant through the second Adam, Jesus Christ. Those who place their faith in Christ come under the benefits of this new covenant of grace.

God Bless

Brian Mason

*Stanley J. Grenz, David Guretzki &, Cherith Fee Nordling, Pocket Dictionary of Theological Terms (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1999), p. 132

Terminology Tuesday: Typology

Differing from a symbol or an allegory, a typology is a representation of an actual, historical reference. According to Christian exegesis, biblical typology deals with the parallels between actual, historical (usually OT) figures or events in salvation history and their later, analogous fulfillment. Often NT events and figures are typologically understood and interpreted according to an OT pattern (e.g., creation and the new creation, Adam and Christ, the exodus and NT concepts of salvation). On this basis typology became one of the four prevalent ways (together with the literal, the analogical and the spiritual) of interpreting Scripture in the Middle Ages.

God Bless

Brian Mason

*Stanley J. Grenz, David Guretzki &, Cherith Fee Nordling, Pocket Dictionary of Theological Terms (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1999), p. 117

Terminology Tuesday: Patripassianism

*Derived from the Greek words pater (father) and pascho (to suffer), the term refers to an early type of modalism that suggests that the one God ( the Father) became incarnate in the form of the Son, was born of a virgin and suffered and died on the cross. This belief was declared heretical by the early church.

God Bless
Brian Mason

*Stanley J. Grenz, David Guretzki &, Cherith Fee Nordling, Pocket Dictionary of Theological Terms (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1999), p. 89

Terminology Tuesday: Heidelberg Catechism

*A confession of faith written by the theology faculty of Heidelberg University at the request of Frederick III, a prince of Germany in the sixteenth century. The Catechism served to instruct young people in the essentials of the faith and was used to prepare them for confirmation. One unique feature of the Catechism is it’s ability to combine Reformed and Lutheran perspectives into a single document.

God Bless

Brian Mason

**Stanley J. Grenz, David Guretzki &, Cherith Fee Nordling, Pocket Dictionary of Theological Terms (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1999), p. 58

Terminology Tuesday: Real Presence Of Christ In The Eucharist

*The belief that Jesus Christ is actually physically and sacramentally present in the bread and the wine at the Lord’s Table, or Holy Communion. The biblical basis for this view includes a literal understanding of Jesus’ words of instruction, “This is my body. … This is my blood” (Mk 14: 22,24) as well as the supposed allusion to the Eucharist in Jesus’ bread-of-life discourse (Jn 6: 53-58). The real presence is taught by Lutherans and Roman Catholics (with substantial differences).

*Stanley J. Grenz, David Guretzki &, Cherith Fee Nordling, Pocket Dictionary of Theological Terms (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1999), p. 99-100

God Bless

Brian Mason

Terminology Tuesday: Materialism

*A philosophical outlook that contends that physical matter is the only reality or category of existence, so that everything that exists is a manifestation of the material (rather than a manifestation of the mind). In more popular parlance, the term refers to pursuit of money and possessions as a central goal of human existence. See also monism.

*Stanley J. Grenz, David Guretzki &, Cherith Fee Nordling, Pocket Dictionary of Theological Terms (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1999), p. 76

God Bless
Brian Mason

Terminology Tuesday: Monasticism

*A way of life within the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox traditions that emphasizes celibacy, life-in-community, poverty, common worship, silence and contemplation. The monastic movement spawned monasteries as places in which monks could live and work together, generally as cloistered from the larger society.

God Bless
Brian Mason

*Stanley J. Grenz, David Guretzki &, Cherith Fee Nordling, Pocket Dictionary of Theological Terms (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1999), p. 80